Our Famous Monkey Bread Recipe

Ok, enough people have now asked for our family’s monkey bread recipe that I thought it was time to just post it here for all the world to enjoy.

(Let’s be real: I keep misplacing my own copy of it, which itself is covered in butter and getting increasingly difficult to read).

NOTE: This is FULL of butter and sugar recipe. So NO, I do NOT have a “lite” version of it. Use REAL butter and not margarine, and enjoy life!

The Howard Family Monkey Bread Recipe

3 cans of Pillsbury Buttermilk biscuits, cut in quarters
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 TBS brown sugar
1 cup walnuts OR pecans chopped (I usually just stick them in a bag and crush them with my hands) – OPTIONAL, but this is just crazy talk.

Topping:

1 1/2 sticks real salted butter
1 cup brown sugar (packed)
1 tsp cinnamon

Mix granulated sugar and 1 TBS of brown sugar in a bowl.
Cut biscuits into quarters and roll pieces in sugar mixture.
Place one layer of coated biscuits in the bottom of greased pan, then sprinkled liberally with nuts.
Repeat with layers until you run out of biscuit pieces!
(THIS PART CAN BE DONE THE NIGHT BEFORE. IF SO, COVER WITH PLASTIC WRAP AND REFRIGERATE.  REMOVE FROM FRIDGE ABOUT AN HOUR BEFORE BAKING.)

monkey bread recipePreheat over to 375 degrees F. Grease a bundt or angel food cake pan with butter.

In large, microwave safe bowl, melt together sticks of butter, brown sugar and cinnamon. Mix well (it will separate slightly) and pour over the biscuits.

Bake at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. If your oven bakes hot, you can reduce oven temp to 350.

Remove from the oven and ask a person with the steadiest hands to place a plate larger than the pan upside-down over the pan. Hold pan + plate together and turn the pan over. (If you mess this part up and it lands on the floor, imagine your dismay!!)

Eat while hot and gooey!

NOTE: We have made this monkey bread recipe in both a dark, non-stick bundt pan, and also a light-colored angel food pan. The brown sugar caramelizes more in the dark-colored pan and was beloved by all. Just FYI!  

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Elizabeth Howard

Elizabeth writes literary non-fiction, haiku, cultural rants, and Demand Poetry in order to forward the cause of beautiful writing. She teaches and speaks about the rhetorical impact of beautiful writing. A recent transplant to Connecticut, she calls London, Kansas City, and Iowa home. 

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